Global Manufacturing Economic Update: August 2016

A Publication of the National Association of Manufacturers

MONDAY ECONOMIC REPORTNAM/IndustryWeek Survey of Manufactures Business Outlook by Quarter, 2012-2014

In the post-Brexit world, much has been made of the uncertainties related to the vote, both for the United Kingdom itself and for the broader global economy. Indeed, global headwinds continue to represent the largest downside risks to U.S. growth. In the aftermath of the British vote, manufacturing in the United Kingdom contracted in July at its fastest pace since February 2013, which is perhaps not surprising given the uncertainties created by the June 23 vote. For its part, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) downgraded worldwide growth in 2016 from 3.2 percent in its April outlook to 3.1 percent in its most recent projection in July. It estimates the United Kingdom will grow 1.7 percent and 1.3 percent in 2016 and 2017, respectively, with the latter figure off 0.9 percent from the April release. At the same time, the IMF added the following disclaimer to its release: “With ‘Brexit’ still very much unfolding, the extent of uncertainty complicates the already difficult task of macroeconomic forecasting.” Indeed, there are already reports showing the U.K. economy declined in July.

Despite lingering global challenges, including Brexit, one could also make the case that the global economy has improved in recent months. The J.P. Morgan Global Manufacturing PMI grew at its fastest pace in July since November on decent growth in orders and output. This was the second straight monthly expansion for the global index after recording essentially stagnant growth in both April and May. In other good news, manufacturing activity in China expanded for the first time since February 2015 (up from 48.6 to 50.6), even as it remains clear that economic growth continues to decelerate for the country. In addition, manufacturers in the emerging markets reported expanding activity in July for only the second time in 16 months, mirroring the progress in China.

Overall, nine of the top 15 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods had expanding manufacturing activity for the month, the same pace as the previous month but up from just five in April. As such, we have seen some progress with key international markets since the spring. However, there are lingering problems in Brazil (up from 43.2 to 46.0), France (up from 48.3 to 48.6), Hong Kong (up from 45.4 to 47.2) and Japan (up from 48.1 to 49.3) that have not abated yet despite some easing in the rates of decline for each in July. Of those top 15 markets, countries with the fastest growth in manufacturing activity in July included Germany (down from 54.5 to 53.8), the Netherlands (up from 52.0 to 53.2), Canada (up from 51.8 to 51.9), Australia (up from 51.0 to 51.8) and Taiwan (up from 50.5 to 51.0). 

The bottom line, however, is that U.S.-manufactured goods exports continue to struggle. Across the past year and a half, international headwinds have made it extremely difficult to increase export sales abroad. Using newly updated figures from TradeStats Express, U.S.-manufactured goods exports totaled $626.3 billion through the first half of 2016, down 5.9 percent from the $665.4 billion in the same time frame in 2015 using seasonally adjusted data. This decline extended the 6.2 percent decrease in U.S.-manufactured goods exports for last year as a whole. Moreover, year-to-date exports were lower to the top six markets for U.S.-manufactured goods.

Trade policy continued to be a prominent campaign issue, with statements in both convention platforms falling short of the key elements that the NAM is seeking, from creating a pathway for consideration of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) this year to other measures that will open markets, improve the competitiveness of manufacturers in the United States and advance a rules-based system. Efforts continue as well to ensure a fully functioning Export-Import (Ex-Im) Bank, to promote increased ratifications of the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA), to move forward the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and to prepare for a new Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) process that will be launched this fall.

Chad Moutray, Ph.D., CBE
Chief Economist
National Association of Manufacturers

Global Economic and Trade Trends

Even with a number of persistent challenges, global manufacturing activity grew at its fastest pace in July since November.
The J.P. Morgan Global Manufacturing PMI rose from 50.4 in June to 51.0 in July. This was the second straight monthly expansion after recording essentially stagnant growth in both April and May. In July, the underlying data were mostly higher across the board, including new orders (up from 50.7 to 51.4) and output (up from 50.4 to 52.1). In addition, exports and employment (both up from 49.9 to 50.2) shifted from a marginal contraction in June to an ever-so-slight expansion in July. Of course, a fair share of the progress in this most recent report might be attributed to better data on manufacturing activity in the United States (up from 51.3 to 52.9). As noted in the prior releases, the United States accounted for one-quarter of the weighting in the global index, and the latest release from Markit reflected a nine-month high for manufacturing activity, with output (up from 50.9 to 53.9) growing modestly after contracting in May.

The manufacturing sector in the United Kingdom contracted in July at its fastest pace since February 2013 (down from 52.1 to 48.2). This is perhaps not surprising given the uncertainties the Brexit vote created on June 23. In contrast, activity in China expanded for the first time since February 2015 (up from 48.6 to 50.6), even as it remains clear that economic growth continues to decelerate for the country. Overall, nine of the top 15 markets for U.S.-manufactured goods had expanding manufacturing activity for the month, the same pace as the previous month but up from just five in April. As such, we have seen some progress with key international markets since the spring. However, there are lingering problems in Brazil (up from 43.2 to 46.0), France (up from 48.3 to 48.6), Hong Kong (up from 45.4 to 47.2) and Japan (up from 48.1 to 49.3) that have not abated yet despite some easing in the rates of decline for each in July.

Of those top 15 markets, countries with the fastest growth in manufacturing activity in July included Germany (down from 54.5 to 53.8), the Netherlands (up from 52.0 to 53.2), Canada (up from 51.8 to 51.9), Australia (up from 51.0 to 51.8) and Taiwan (up from 50.5 to 51.0).  

In the aftermath of the Brexit vote, Eurozone manufacturing activity eased somewhat, led by the United Kingdom itself contracting.
The Markit Eurozone Manufacturing PMI decreased from 52.8 in June, its high-water mark so far in 2016, to 52.0 in July. New orders (down from 53.6 to 52.2), exports (down from 52.8 to 52.4) and employment (down from 52.4 to 52.3) all decelerated a bit in July, even as each continued to expand somewhat modestly. On the other hand, output growth remained at decent levels (unchanged at 53.9), sustaining its fastest pace year-to-date.

Of course, the biggest drag—both in broader confidence and on the weighting of the Eurozone measure (ironically)—comes from the United Kingdom (down from 52.4 to 48.2), which plunged into contraction territory for the first time since February 2013. The United Kingdom is likely to slow materially in its outlook post-Brexit, a sharp turnaround from when it was one of the brighter spots in Europe. Indeed, the United Kingdom’s manufacturing PMI measured 55.2 as recently as October. In the most recent data, real GDP in the United Kingdom rose 0.6 percent in the second quarter, with 2.2 percent growth year-over-year. Yet, manufacturing production dropped 0.3 percent in June but was up 1.0 percent over the past 12 months. It will be interesting to see how those figures change post-Brexit. There are already reports showing the U.K. economy declined in July.

Of the other markets in the Eurozone, Ireland (down from 53.0 to 50.2) has perhaps been the most negatively impacted, both because of its geographic proximity and economic ties to the United Kingdom. Ireland’s manufacturing PMI fell to its lowest level since May 2013, with new orders and output contracting. Austria (down from 54.5 to 53.4), Germany (down from 54.5 to 53.8), Italy (down from 53.5 to 51.2) and Spain (down from 52.2 to 51.0) also slowed in their growth rates, with German sentiment easing despite production expanding at its fastest rate since April 2014. In contrast to those nations, activity in the Netherlands accelerated somewhat to a four-month high (up from 52.0 to 53.2) on stronger demand and production. Meanwhile, challenges continue to linger for both France (up from 48.3 to 48.6) and Greece (down from 50.4 to 48.7), with the latter slipping back into contraction territory, where it has been in five of the past six months.

Eurozone real GDP grew 0.3 percent in the second quarter, decelerating a bit from 0.5 percent growth in the first quarter. On a year-over-year basis, the Eurozone economy has grown 1.6 percent, off from 1.7 percent in the first quarter. New industrial production data for June will come out on August 12. Retail sales were flat in June, increasing 1.6 percent over the past 12 months, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 10.1 percent, its lowest level since July 2011. Pricing pressures ticked slightly higher but remained quite minimal. The annual inflation rate was 0.2 percent in July, up from -0.1 percent in May and 0.1 percent in June.

hinese manufacturing expanded for the first time since February 2015.
The Caixin China General Manufacturing PMI increased from 48.6 to 50.6, signaling some stabilization in activity after contracting in 18 of the prior 19 months. The higher figure in July stemmed from growth in new orders (up from 49.0 to 51.2) and output (up from 48.1 to 52.1), with the expansion in production increasing at its fastest pace since July 2014. At the same time, exports (up from 47.9 to 49.5) and employment (up from 46.4 to 46.9) continued to decline, albeit at a slower pace in this report for both indices. Hiring has now fallen in every month but one for more than three years. In contrast to the private-sector data from Markit and Caixin, the official manufacturing PMI data from the National Bureau of Statistics of China slipped back into contraction territory ever so slightly, down from 50.0 in June to 49.9 in July, led by softness among small and medium-sized manufacturers. 

Real GDP increased 6.7 percent year-over-year in the second quarter, mirroring the rate in the first quarter. My forecast is for real GDP to expand 6.6 percent, using official estimates, for 2016 as a whole. We will get new data on industrial production, retail sales and fixed asset investment today. The June data reflected a slight pickup in activity in some measures, even as the larger trend continues to be one about decelerating activity in China. Along those lines, industrial production expanded 6.2 percent year-over-year in June, up from 6.0 percent in May but down from 6.8 percent in March. Retail sales were also better, up from 10.0 percent year-over-year in May to 10.6 percent in June. That was the fastest pace so far in 2016, but still down from 11.1 percent in December. On the other hand, the pace of fixed asset investment continued to slow, down from 9.6 percent year-over-year in May to 9.0 percent in June.

Mirroring the progress in China, manufacturing in the emerging markets expanded for only the second time in 16 months.
The Markit Emerging Markets Manufacturing Index rose from 49.3 to 50.3, its highest level since February 2015. New orders (up from 49.7 to 50.8) and output (up from 49.4 to 51.5) both expanded in July. At the same time, exports (up from 48.7 to 49.5) and employment (up from 47.9 to 48.1) continued to contract, but at a slower rate of decline for the month. In addition, the forward-looking composite index for future output signaled cautious optimism for the months ahead, even with a slight easing in the latest numbers (down from 60.5 to 60.2).

Despite the progress in the headline index, the country-by-country data were mixed. Manufacturing activity in the emerging markets closely follows what is happening in China, and as noted, China expanded for the first time in a year and half (up from 48.6 to 50.6). India (up from 51.7 to 51.8), Poland (down from 51.8 to 50.3), South Korea (down from 50.5 to 50.1), Taiwan (up from 50.5 to 51.0) and Vietnam (down from 52.6 to 51.9) also grew in July, even as some eased for the month. Along those lines, Poland’s manufacturing sector—one of the bright spots in Europe and the emerging markets just a few months ago—grew at its slowest pace since September 2014.

At the same time, three markets slipped back into contraction in July: Czech Republic (down from 51.8 to 49.3), Indonesia (down from 51.9 to 48.4) and Russia (down from 51.5 to 49.5). Similar to Poland, the Czech Republic was one of the fastest-growing emerging markets earlier in the year, but its economy has deteriorated since then, contracting for the first time since April 2013. Several other nations remained in contraction territory in July, with many mired in a place they have been for much of the past few years. Those countries include Brazil (up from 43.2 to 46.0), Hong Kong (up from 45.4 to 47.2), Malaysia (up from 47.1 to 48.1), Nigeria (up from 47.3 to 48.8), South Africa (up from 49.6 to 49.9) and Turkey (up from 47.4 to 47.6). It will be interesting to see how the attempted coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan changes the Turkish numbers in the August data.

Canada's manufacturers report improved activity.
The RBC Canadian Manufacturing PMI edged slightly higher, up from 51.8 to 51.9 and expanding for the fifth straight month. This is a sign that manufacturing activity in Canada is continuing to stabilize after weaknesses across much of the past few years related to lower energy prices. In July, new orders (up from 50.8 to 51.5), output (up from 51.5 to 52.0) and hiring (up from 52.0 to 52.4) were higher, but exports contracted for the second time in the past three months (down from 50.2 to 48.4). As in prior months, manufacturers in Alberta and British Columbia continued to struggle (up from 46.2 to 48.8), albeit with some easing, whereas other regions of Canada grew at a more decent pace despite some deceleration for the month, including Ontario (down from 53.6 to 52.9), Quebec (down from 54.6 to 52.0) and the rest of Canada (down from 57.0 to 55.1).

Despite better sentiment data, real GDP fell 0.6 percent in May in Canada, and manufacturing output declined 2.4 percent. Much of the decline in manufacturing production stemmed from reduced petroleum output, but there were also broader weaknesses in chemicals, nonmetallic mineral products and transportation equipment, among others. On a year-over-year basis, real GDP for manufacturing has decreased 0.8 percent since May 2015. Meanwhile, retail sales grew 0.2 percent in May, extending the 0.8 percent gain in April. Over the past 12 months, retail spending in Canada has risen 3.6 percent, or 2.5 percent when adjusted for inflation. The unemployment rate inched up from 6.8 percent in June to 6.9 percent in July, returning to the level in May. The good news was that manufacturing employment increased 5,600 in July, even as the sector has lost 18,800 workers on net year-over-year.

Mexican manufacturing activity grew at its slowest rate since October 2013.
The Markit Mexico Manufacturing PMI decreased from 51.1 in June to 50.6 in July. Interestingly, the May reading had been the highest since April 2014, suggesting a weakening shift in sentiment in the past few months. The underlying data were mixed. Output returned to expansion territory (up from 49.8 to 50.1), albeit barely, even as export growth contracted for the first time since October 2014 (down from 50.4 to 47.2). Declines in exports served as the biggest drag on the headline number in this latest report. Meanwhile, new orders (down from 52.3 to 51.0) and hiring (down from 50.8 to 50.6) both downshifted somewhat for the month.

We will get new industrial production data today, but the slowing sentiment survey figures mirrored the most recent data. Industrial production slowed, easing from 1.9 percent year-over-year in April to 0.4 percent in May. Manufacturing output also decelerated, down from 2.9 percent year-over-year in April to 0.8 percent in May. Overall, real GDP increased 2.6 percent year-over-year in the first quarter, up from 2.4 percent in the fourth quarter of 2015. Growth in Mexico is expected to remain around 2.5 percent in 2016, but it is predicted to pick up to 3.0 percent in 2017.

U.S.-manufactured goods exports continue to struggle.
Across the past year and a half, international headwinds have made it extremely difficult to increase export sales abroad. Using newly updated figures from TradeStats Express, U.S.-manufactured goods exports totaled $626.3 billion through the first half of 2016, down 5.9 percent from the $665.4 billion in the same time frame in 2015 using seasonally adjusted data. This decline extended the 6.2 percent decrease in U.S.-manufactured goods exports for last year as a whole.

Moreover, year-to-date exports were lower to the top six markets for U.S.-manufactured goods, including Canada (down 5.4 percent), Mexico (down 2.5 percent), China (down 4.9 percent), Japan (down 6.3 percent), the United Kingdom (down 1.0 percent) and Germany (down 2.3 percent).

The U.S. trade deficit widened in June to a four-month high.
The trade deficit rose from $40.96 billion in May to $44.51 billion in June, its highest level since February. The data have been quite volatile through the first half of 2016, averaging $40.79 billion. That was somewhat lower than the $41.70 billion average for 2015 as a whole. The higher figure in June’s report stemmed from an increase in goods imports (up from $182.05 billion to $186.41 billion), which was enough to offset a slight increase in goods exports (up from $119.83 billion to $120.37 billion).

A fair share of the jump in the trade deficit came from petroleum, with the petroleum trade deficit up from $2.89 billion in May—its lowest level since February 1999—to $5.32 billion in June. Petroleum imports accelerated from $11.12 billion to $13.28 billion, but petroleum exports edged down from $8.23 billion to $7.95 billion. Higher crude oil prices likely played a role in the increase in imports.

Looking more closely at the underlying data, goods exports were mixed in June. Increased exports for foods, feeds and beverages (up $587 million), consumer goods (up $427 million) and capital goods (up $339 million) offset declines for automotive vehicles and parts (down $433 million), other goods (down $117 million) and industrial supplies and materials (down $92 million). In contrast, imports of industrial supplies and materials rose sharply, up $2.30 billion, mostly from petroleum products, with increases also observed for consumer goods (up $1.87 billion) and capital goods (up $1.03 billion). Meanwhile, there were fewer imports in June for automotive vehicles and parts (down $541 million) and foods, feeds and beverages (down $336 million).

International Trade Policy Trends

TPP consideration faces continued challenges.
Discussions between the Obama administration and members of the Senate Finance and House Ways and Means committees have yet to produce a resolution to outstanding issues. President Barack Obama expressed continued confidence that Congress can pass TPP this year, while House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) has expressed some doubt, as NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons called on all sides to make it a priority. The NAM also expressed concern at the complete lack of any TPP mention in the Republican National Committee platform and the failure of the Democratic National Committee platform to support TPP. NAM efforts are continuing in August to bring home the message on TPP to members of Congress and local communities through trade education and congressional dialogues. To become involved in those activities or to join the NAM’s advocacy efforts on TPP, contact NAM Director of International Trade Policy Ken Monahan.

TTIP talks continued in July, but no new round announced.
The 14th round of U.S.–EU TTIP talks took place the week of July 11 in Brussels, where the United States and European Union sought to consolidate as much text as possible and continue to move forward each of the various chapter negotiations. Differences remain on a number of issues. As well, the status of the United Kingdom in any final TTIP has raised some questions on the U.S. side. The European Union has laid out a new proposed annex on engineering, on which the NAM is seeking comment. No new round has been announced. For more information on the NAM’s TTIP advocacy efforts, contact NAM Director of International Trade Policy Ken Monahan.

Input sought on identification of foreign trade barriers.
The Office of the United States Trade Representative is seeking input for its annual “National Trade Estimate Report on Foreign Trade Barriers,” also known as the NTE Report. The NAM files annual comments noting major types and examples of trade barriers that are negatively impacting manufacturers in the United States as part of its work to press for action to address such barriers. (For reference, see the NAM’s most recent set of comments.) Please provide any input for inclusion in this year’s report to NAM Director of International Business Policy Ryan Ong no later than September 30. All interested organizations can file their own comments as well through this portal, with final comments due on October 27.

Business associations urge action on the TFA to ensure entry into force.
More than 30 business associations joined the NAM this week in urging countries to ratify a milestone agreement that will improve customs and border processing around the world. Nearly three years ago, the WTO concluded negotiations on a landmark TFA to cut red tape at global borders, increase transparency and decrease costs for consumers, companies and governments. Fulfilling the commitments outlined in the TFA will spur investment around the world and bolster global job growth. Despite the broad support for the TFA, however, the agreement has not yet entered into force. At last count, 90 countries had officially ratified the TFA. Of the countries that have yet to submit their ratifications to the WTO, about a dozen are U.S. free trade agreement (FTA) partners. The TFA will enter into force once two-thirds of WTO members—109 countries—domestically ratify the agreement. Letters were sent to each of the 74 countries that have not yet ratified the TFA. Examples can be found here for FTA partners and here for non-FTA partners. For more information on the framework, contact NAM Vice President of International Economic Affairs Linda Dempsey.

The NAM continues pressing Senate to act on Ex-Im Bank Board quorum.
The Ex-Im Bank remains closed for certain transactions, undermining the ability of U.S. exporters and their supply chains to compete and win in a tough global marketplace. In July, the House Appropriations Committee approved an amendment offered by Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA) to the House version of the FY17 State & Foreign Operations bill that would modify the quorum requirement for the Ex-Im Bank Board through September 30, 2019. The amendment was adopted by voice vote, as was the underlying bill. The language mirrors the Ex-Im Board quorum language in the Senate’s FY17 State & Foreign Operations bill (report language here) that was approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee in June by a vote of 30–0. The NAM will continue working with our members to press for resolution of this issue. According to The New York Times, more than 30 transactions worth more than $20 billion to American businesses are stuck in the pipeline until the agency is fully operational. Visit www.nam.org/exim to learn more or www.exportersforexim.org to contact your senator. To learn more about the NAM’s advocacy efforts on this issue, contact NAM Vice President of International Economic Affairs Linda Dempsey.

Comments on U.S. International Trade Commission's (ITC) new MTB process due by August 16.
On June 15, the ITC issued a notice in the Federal Register requesting public comment on two proposed MTB Petition System forms: Information for Petitions and Information for Comments. Comments on the two draft forms will be accepted via the ITC’s Electronic Document Information System through August 16. The ITC will issue final forms when it initiates the MTB process no later than October 15. To participate in the NAM’s MTB Task Force and for more information on the new ITC process, contact NAM Director of International Trade Policy Ken Monahan.

Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA) talks intensify in July.
The 15th round of EGA negotiations took place the week of July 25 in Geneva, Switzerland, where discussions continued on the products nominated for duty-free treatment by the United States and other countries. The countries negotiating the EGA have committed to seek to achieve a so-called “landing zone” for the negotiations by the September G20 Summit in Hangzhou, China, and conclude an ambitious EGA by the end of 2016 that seeks to eliminate tariffs on a broad range of environmental goods. Discussions will intensify in the coming months as all sides seek to reach an agreement. For more information on the NAM’s role as co-chair of the U.S.-based Coalition for Green Trade, contact NAM Director of International Trade Policy Ken Monahan.

Commerce Department now accepting self-certifications for EU–U.S. Privacy Shield Framework.
Following the July 12 approval of the EU–U.S. Privacy Shield Framework, to replace the former U.S.–EU Safe Harbor Framework to address data sharing, the Commerce Department began accepting self-certifications via the new EU–U.S. Privacy Shield website on August 1. The website also provides additional information to assist stakeholders in understanding the new framework and requirements for self-certification to a business’s adherence to the Privacy Shield principles. For more information on the framework, contact NAM Director of International Trade Policy Ken Monahan.

New U.S. government report charts impact of foreign technical regulations on U.S. exports.
A new report released by the Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration (ITA) showed that 92 percent of U.S. goods exports in 2015—more than $1.3 trillion—were potentially affected by foreign technical regulations. These regulations impact a range of manufacturing sectors, such as machinery and electronics, vehicles, chemicals, cosmetics and food and beverage products. The European Union notifies more new and revised regulations than other countries; other leading notifiers include China, South Korea, Brazil and Saudi Arabia. For more information on the report or on the NAM’s efforts on standards and technical regulations, contact NAM Director of International Business Policy Ryan Ong.

Indian Parliament passes bill clearing way for unified goods and services tax, as United States and India prepare for next Strategic and Commercial Dialogue (S&CD).
India’s Parliament marked a significant reform step in recent days with the passage of a constitutional amendment to allow the central government to create a new national sales tax for products and services, called the goods and services tax (GST). The bill, which passed through Parliament’s upper house (Rajya Sabha) on August 3 and the lower house (Lok Sabha) on August 8, authorizes the government to create the GST to replace a series of national and local taxes with a new unified GST that had raised costs for manufacturers and supply chains operating in India. While this passage is an important breakthrough, it is only the start of a series of steps needed to implement the GST, including state government passage of the constitutional amendment as well as the draft and passage of at least two additional bills to launch the GST—steps that could come late in 2016. The United States and India are preparing for the second S&CD in late August. The NAM has urged the S&CD to focus on concrete deliverables to address key tariff and nontariff barriers, other discriminatory measures and weak enforcement of intellectual property. For more information on the NAM’s work on India, contact NAM Director of International Business Policy Ryan Ong.

Exports in Action

Webinar: Trans-Pacific Partnership Country Webinar Series:
Canada and Mexico – August 10
Japan – August 24
Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei – September 7
Australia and New Zealand – September 21
Vietnam – October 5

The ITA will host a series of webinars to discuss how U.S. businesses will benefit from the TPP. Each webinar will focus on one or more of the 11 other TPP markets and provide insight into each. These sessions will help businesses of all sizes better understand how the trade deal will improve competitiveness and expand market access in each nation. For more information, click on the link corresponding with each event.

Discover Global Markets: Healthcare Connections
Bellevue, Wash.
September 13–15

As part of its Business Forum Series, the U.S. Commercial Service will hold a two-day conference on the international health care industry. The agenda includes insight from industry leaders and global updates on health care opportunities, regulation and best practices. Panel topics will include the medical device sector, diagnostics, health IT and global health. In addition, U.S. Commercial representatives from more than 20 countries will be available for one-on-one market consultations. For more information, click here.

SupplySide West
Las Vegas, Nev.
October 4–8

SupplySide West is the world’s leading ingredient and solutions trade show with more than 1,000 exhibitors and more than 120 hours of education programming. The four-day exhibition highlights new innovations and products in the food, beverage, supplement, animal nutrition, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and personal care product markets. In addition to networking opportunities on the trade floor, participants will have access to various trainings, workshops and panel discussions related to the consumer packaged goods industry. For more information, click here.

Discover Global Markets: Building Smart Cities
Chicago, Ill.
November 1–3

The U.S. Commercial Service and the Illinois District Export Council will host a three-day conference focused on the development of more sustainable cities throughout the world. Participants will engage with trade experts, industry professionals and U.S. commercial service diplomats through panel presentations and executive meetings to learn more about business opportunities and challenges as cities strive to become more sustainable. The conference will highlight modern infrastructure projects, green technologies, cybersecurity, disaster mitigation and a number of other critical components as cities strive to improve standards of living. For more information, click here.

Safety & Security Trade Mission to Saudi Arabia & Kuwait
November 1218

The ITA will lead a trade mission for companies looking to develop or increase exports of safety and security goods to Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The mission will include customized one-on-one business meetings with prescreened buyers, market briefings, networking events and meetings with industry leaders. For more information, click here.
Application deadline: September 1

For a listing of other upcoming Commerce Department trade missions, click here.

Questions or Comments?

Contact Chief Economist Chad Moutray at cmoutray@nam.org.

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