Trade

Press Releases

NAM Hosts “Rebuilding Ukraine: Inaugural Conference of Manufacturers in the U.S. and Ukraine”

Washington, D.C. – This week, the National Association of Manufacturers and the Ukrainian League of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs co-hosted “Rebuilding Ukraine: Inaugural Conference of Manufacturers in the U.S. and Ukraine.” The conference was led by NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons and ULIE President Anatolii Kinakh.

“Manufacturers have demonstrated their unwavering support for Ukraine and denounced Russian aggression,” said Timmons. “Manufacturers in the U.S. have a long and proud history of standing firm in support of democracy, the rule of law, transparency, freedom and opportunity. We stand with President Zelenskyy, the Ukrainian government and the Ukrainian people as they defend those values and as they work to rebuild their country in the years ahead.”

Also participating were senior Ukrainian government officials and manufacturers, as well as NAM member companies with a presence in Ukraine and the U.S. During the meeting, Kinakh thanked the U.S. for its comprehensive support of Ukraine, including through the providing of defense arms, funding and other aspects.

“This is the first business conference of Ukraine and the U.S. on such a scale,” said Kinakh. “In our view, it will enable our partners in the U.S. to learn about the true situation in Ukraine, the business climate and our priorities. It will be the basis to shape direct ties, common interests and business plans that will boost economic activities of Ukraine.”

Kinakh stressed that a stable economy, new jobs and welfare growth for the Ukrainian people were crucial to achieve victory over Russia. Furthermore, he invited American businesses that are not currently operating in Ukraine to invest in the promising sectors in the country, including information technology, energy, infrastructure, industry renovation and education.

To formalize manufacturers’ commitment to supporting Ukraine, the NAM and the ULIE signed a Memorandum of Understanding at the meeting yesterday. This MOU will serve as a roadmap to the cooperation between the two organizations and outlines the key goals and objectives for the partnership.

In March 2022, in the wake of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the NAM Board of Directors unanimously voted to denounce Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and to stand with the people of Ukraine in their fight to preserve freedom and independence. The resolution expressed support for the economic and financial sanctions implemented against Russia and called for the removal of the Russian Federation from the World Trade Organization and termination of permanent normalized trading relationship status with the U.S.

-NAM-

 

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.81 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visiwww.nam.org.


ULIE

Ukrainian League of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (ULIE) is a strong non-governmental association uniting large enterprises and SMEs, which produce 80% of Ukrainian GDP. The League has 28 representative offices abroad and 39 committees for various sectors. ULIE is an observer organization in business at OECD and cooperates with BusinessEurope. It established several bilateral business councils (with Lithuania, Latvia and others).

For more information, please visit https://uspp.ua/en/.

Policy and Legal

House Unveils New China Committee

The House of Representatives has made a key move this week to strengthen its oversight of the complex U.S.–China relationship—a development that the NAM supported.

The House has established the Select Committee on the Strategic Competition Between the United States and the Chinese Communist Party, which will aim to “investigate and submit policy recommendations on the status of the Chinese Communist Party’s economic, technological and security progress and its competition with the United States,” according to the bill.

Why it’s important: The NAM has long called for more robust efforts to reset the relationship and hold China accountable for discriminatory economic practices and policies.

  • These practices have had a deleterious effect on U.S. manufacturing competitiveness, as NAM Vice President of International Economic Affairs Ken Monahan told Acting Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Trade Policy and Economics William Shpiece in September.​​​​​​
  • “From unfair import and export subsidies and industrial policies to intellectual property theft, manufacturers and workers in the U.S. face an unfair playing field that harms manufacturing in the U.S. and holds back the industry,” Monahan said.

What can be done: The NAM continues to advocate several key actions, which it enumerated last May to the new committee’s predecessor, the House Foreign Affairs Committee’s China Task Force. These include:

  • Boosting domestic investment in manufacturing, supply chains and infrastructure here at home;
  • Increasing U.S. leadership in writing the rules of trade—globally through leading the modernization of the World Trade Organization and regionally through steps to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership and new frameworks such as the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework;
  • Working at home and with allies abroad to tighten pressure on China to fully meet its trade and economic commitments and halt problematic trade behaviors; and
  • Upgrading national security regulatory frameworks such as investment security and export controls through targeted, effective reforms.

The final word: “We have to get China right: the U.S.–China economic relationship has long needed a reset to work for manufacturers large and small across the country grappling with harmful and discriminatory Chinese trade behaviors,” said NAM Senior Director of International Trade and Regulatory Affairs Ryan Ong.

  • “Manufacturers welcome robust efforts by Congress and the broader U.S. government to level the playing field for manufacturers and allow them to compete fairly everywhere, including in the U.S., China and around the world.”
Policy and Legal

Timmons Highlights Manufacturing Priorities in Mexico

NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons traveled to Mexico City this week to participate in U.S.–Mexico–Canada business delegation meetings at the North American Leaders’ Summit.

The background: The trilateral summit brought together U.S. President Joe Biden, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to advance North American solutions to current challenges facing the region.

  • The leaders’ meetings focused on issues including competitiveness, climate, immigration, development, the environment, health and diversity and inclusion.

The goal: The NAM was focused on conveying the critical importance of full implementation of the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement to support North American competitiveness, investment and supply chain resiliency. Timmons emphasized the need for an investment climate that is grounded in core principles like transparency and the rule of law.

Strengthening alliances: During a conversation with Prime Minister Trudeau, Timmons praised Canada’s partnership in launching USMCA consultations on Mexico’s energy policies and urged continued cooperation.

  • “We firmly believe that the USMCA should be a model for how our three nations can capitalize on our close regional economic ties,” said Timmons during a meeting with the prime minister. “That means we have to make sure our governments are upholding their commitments under the agreement.”

Demanding accountability: In a meeting with U.S., Mexican and Canadian economic ministers, Timmons lauded free trade and pressed the nations to live up to the promises made under international agreements.

  • “The USMCA can only reach its full potential if we all respect the agreements that have been made to bind our countries together,” said Timmons.

Laying out challenges: During the meeting, Timmons urged our North American partners to address a series of issues that have caused concern for manufacturers in the United States. He cited a number of challenges related to Mexico that spurred a lengthy exchange with new Mexican Economy Minister Raquel Buenrostro. These issues included:

  • Mexican energy and power policies that have favored the interests of Mexican state-owned entities over U.S. companies;
  • Labeling requirements for food and nonalcoholic beverages;
  • Lack of competition in Mexico’s telecommunications market;
  • Measures that would require overly costly and complicated electronic waybills (the “Carta Porte” issue);
  • Mexico’s delayed approvals of biopharmaceuticals and other products; and
  • Mexico’s bans on the sale of certain goods including chemicals and genetically modified corn.

Timmons also highlighted a number of differences with Canada in recent years, including on the regulation of plastics, patent reviews and dairy market access.

The big picture: During the trip, Timmons underscored the importance of capitalism and free markets, both in North America and more broadly, according to POLITICO (subscription).

  • “The world is changing right now,” said Timmons. “We have democracies versus autocracies, we have freedom versus repression, we have capitalism versus a command economy. And I think our challenge is to really emphasize the power of free markets to lift everyone up and show how it creates opportunities and enhances the quality of life.”
Press Releases

Manufacturers: Protecting American Innovation Critical to Fight Current and Future Health Crises

Washington, D.C. – Following today’s announcement by the World Trade Organization’s General Council that member states have agreed to delay a final decision on an expanded intellectual property waiver for COVID-19 products, National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement:

“The WTO’s decision to delay the expanded intellectual property waiver is a welcome step toward protecting American innovation and technology leadership. This is vital not only for future pandemic responses, but also for the sector’s ability to produce new and advanced treatments or fund critical research and development.

“Manufacturers in the U.S. are leading our post-pandemic recovery and investing heavily in the development of cures and therapeutics. An expanded WTO waiver would force manufacturers in America to give away rights unfairly to international competitors and economic rivals like China, disincentivize companies from continuing the cutting-edge research underway, put jobs at risk and harm the sector’s global competitiveness.

“Manufacturers will continue to work with partners around the world to tackle current and emerging health challenges, while protecting the IP rights of those many companies which have been so essential to an effective pandemic response.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org

Press Releases

Manufacturers: An Expanded IP Waiver Would Jeopardize American Innovation and the Ability to Combat Future Pandemics

Washington, D.C. – Following the announcement by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative calling for a delay in a World Trade Organization decision on whether to expand a waiver of intellectual property, National Association of Manufacturers Vice President of International Economic Affairs Ken Monahan released the following statement:

“An expanded intellectual property waiver would jeopardize American innovations that are fundamental to fighting current and future pandemics and undermine U.S. technology leadership over our commercial rivals, such as China. Manufacturers welcome USTR’s announcement supporting a delay in the decision on whether or not to expand the WTO’s waiver on COVID-19 products and domestic supply chains and urge all WTO members to fully consider the consequences of such an expanded waiver.

“Efforts could be better spent focusing on other effective international approaches to deal with ongoing and potential global health crises.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and has the largest economic multiplier of any major sector and accounts for 58% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Policy and Legal

Timmons Talks Workforce, Immigration and Tax Reform

Get the Latest News

Get involved

The NAM took its competitiveness agenda on a media tour last week. In appearances on CNBC, Bloomberg and Yahoo! Finance, NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons called for policy moves that will benefit manufacturers and the U.S. as a whole.

Immigration and workforce: Timmons noted that despite the addition of 14,000 jobs in November, manufacturing continues to see a workforce gap of about 830,000 every month. But there’s a solution we’ve been overlooking, he continued.

  • “We have 100,000 Ukrainians we invited here,” Timmons told Yahoo! Finance anchor Seana Smith. “We have 100,000 Afghans that we invited here. But we don’t give them the ability to work. We don’t give them a work permit. They’re in line, waiting to get that work permit. That’s just crazy. We have 200,000 people that could work today if we could just get through the bureaucracy.”

Talent: “Right now, things are very good in the sector, and I think it portends for a bright future for the economy,” Timmons told Michael Santoli on CNBC’s “Closing Bell.” However, filling open jobs remains a top priority.

  • “The National Association of Manufacturers and the Manufacturing Institute have a ‘Creators Wanted’ campaign [that’s] trying to inspire that next generation, trying to bring more women into the workforce, trying to bring veterans into the workforce, working on second chance hiring,” Timmons said. “We’re doing everything we can to attract folks into the sector, and I think we’re being successful in doing that.”

Keep the change(s): Timmons also discussed the need to keep in place the tax reforms of 2017, some of which expire at the end of 2022. These changes have enabled many manufacturers to invest in their businesses, raise wages and grow.

  • “We have had four consecutive years of record wage growth in the sector. That has been made possible … by the tax reforms enacted in 2017,” Timmons said on Bloomberg’s “Balance of Power.” “We have had record investment, record job creation and record wage growth because of those reforms that were made.”
  • However, “[i]mmediate expensing, interest deductibility and the research and development tax credit are all coming to an end at the end of this month,” Timmons continued. “We need Congress to renew that to be able to keep those great reforms of 2017 in place.”
Policy and Legal

NAM Pushes for a Robust U.S. Trade Agenda

Get the Latest News

Get involved

The negotiation and implementation of robust, new trade agreements are an essential part of a manufacturing competitiveness agenda. As we head into a new year, the NAM is pressing for the kind of strong rules and partnerships the industry needs.

Forging new trade agreements: The NAM is urging policymakers to negotiate a series of substantial new trade pacts that strengthen trade ties with U.S. allies and other trading partners and expand on open trade in general. Important initiatives include:

  • Negotiating regional accords, including the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework and the Americas Partnership for Economic Prosperity, which support manufacturing jobs in the U.S. by including key provisions that open markets, strengthen U.S. innovation and technology leadership, raise global standards and establish best-in-class trade rules; and
  • Reengaging in trade agreement talks with the United Kingdom and Kenya and exploring trade agreements with additional markets in Latin America, Africa and beyond.

Enforcing existing pacts: The NAM is also pressing for the comprehensive enforcement of existing U.S. trade agreements—including the full implementation of the United States–Mexico–Canada Agreement and the U.S.–China “Phase One” Trade Agreement. As a strong supporter and advocate for the USMCA, the NAM is advocating the reversal of Mexican and Canadian policies that are against the letter and spirit of the agreement.

  • In June, NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons laid out a series of challenges that manufacturers in the U.S. are facing in Mexico, telling the Biden administration: “Failure to prioritize enforcement of these commercial challenges will undermine the long-term credibility of the USMCA.”

Implementing a comprehensive China trade strategy: The NAM has long advocated for a comprehensive strategy for the U.S. trade relationship with China. While the U.S. and China have moved forward with important conversations, the  Biden administration should implement a clear China trade and economic strategy that can strengthen our ability to compete economically with and in China, as well as hold China accountable for its behaviors.

  • “The U.S. must develop, and strategically use, a full playbook of legislative and enforcement tools to pressure China to stop its discriminatory economic policies and level the playing field for manufacturers and workers in the U.S.,” NAM Vice President of International Economic Affairs Ken Monahan told the Office of the United States Trade Representative in September.
  • Monahan also urged the immediate launch of a “comprehensive, transparent and robust Section 301 tariff exclusion process with meaningful retroactivity” to ensure that such measures aren’t undermining efforts to strengthen manufacturing in the U.S.

Next steps: “Manufacturers need open global markets to ensure that we benefit from the same principles that we seek here at home: nondiscrimination, fairness, equal opportunity and competition,” said Monahan. “As we look to 2023 and beyond, the forging of ambitious new U.S. trade agreements, robust enforcement of our existing accords and the implementation of a comprehensive U.S. trade strategy toward China will be vital as we advance that agenda.”

Policy and Legal

The NAM Outlines Post-Election Priorities

Get the Latest News

Get involved

Though some midterm races remain uncalled, the NAM is preparing the next phase of its competitiveness agenda. Last Thursday, it offered members a breakdown of the election results so far and what they mean for manufacturing policies and priorities in the United States.

The briefing: Hosted by NAM Vice President of Government Relations Jordan Stoick, the conversation provided members with an overview of the NAM’s key issue areas, presented by several of the NAM’s policy experts.

  • Tax: According to NAM Managing Vice President of Tax and Domestic Economic Policy Chris Netram, the NAM is pushing Congress to approve key tax incentives for manufacturers in a year-end package, including the reversal of a harmful change in the treatment of R&D expenses that took effect earlier this year and an extension of 100% bonus depreciation. Beyond the lame-duck session, the NAM will be fighting to make tax reform permanent, he added.
  • Trade: According to NAM Vice President of International Economic Affairs Policy Ken Monahan, the NAM will be advocating reauthorization of the Miscellaneous Tariff Bill. Going forward, priorities will include guarding against the TRIPS waiver at the World Trade Organization (which would harm manufacturers’ intellectual property rights), defusing regulatory and market access challenges in Mexico and promoting a robust market-opening agenda overall.
  • Energy: NAM Vice President of Energy and Resources Policy Rachel Jones said energy security is likely to remain a key focus of policymakers. She highlighted permitting reform as a possible area for bipartisan progress and noted that implementation of new climate incentives and programs will likely come with heightened oversight from the new Congress next year.
  • Infrastructure: NAM Vice President of Infrastructure, Innovation and Human Resources Policy Robyn Boerstling noted that supply chain challenges are the most difficult issue facing manufacturers at the moment. She also provided an update on rail negotiations, addressed the National Labor Relations Board’s robust pro-labor agenda and spoke out in favor of the NAM’s commonsense immigration approach, among other issues.

The outlook: “The good news is that regardless of the outcome, the NAM remains uniquely positioned to continue to effectively advocate on your behalf with the Biden administration and with both parties, whoever’s in control on Capitol Hill,” said Stoick.

  • “We’ve worked successfully with the administration and the current Congress over the past two years to achieve important policy wins on things like infrastructure and the CHIPS semiconductor and competition bill. And we’ve been successful at pushing back on harmful policies and overreach, including stopping what should be considered some of the worst parts of the tax increases that were proposed over the past two years.”
Press Releases

Manufacturers Wake Up to Welcome News of Railway Agreement

Washington, D.C. – Following news of a tentative agreement between U.S. railroad companies and unions to avoid a strike, National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement:

“This morning’s announcement of a tentative agreement between the railroads and their workers is a welcome relief. Manufacturers had been putting into place contingency plans as they were facing disruptions with moving their supplies and products. Manufacturers thank President Biden, Secretary Walsh, Secretary Buttigieg and others in the administration who understood the stakes and stepped in to help prevent a very serious nightmare for the supply chain.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.8 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 58% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Press Releases

Manufacturers Call for Quick Resolution to Rail Negotiations

Timmons: Delays in concluding the rail negotiations will exacerbate the pain of inflation and supply chain disruptions, and failing to reach an agreem

Washington, D.C. – Following news that White House aides and Cabinet officials spent Tuesday reviewing contingency plans for a work stoppage, including outreach to shippers, truckers and air-freight lines to keep goods moving, National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement on the ongoing negotiations between Class I railroads and labor unions representing the freight rail workforce:

“For years now, America’s manufacturing workers have endured the effects of rapidly rising material costs and severe supply chain disruptions, and our member surveys have shown quarter after quarter that these are among the top challenges affecting manufacturing growth in America. Further delays in concluding the rail negotiations will exacerbate the pain of inflation and supply chain disruptions, and failing to reach an agreement before Friday’s deadline would devastate the movement of manufactured products that families depend on,” said Timmons. “The Presidential Emergency Board has announced reasonable recommendations that nearly all parties have accepted, so now is the time to resolve remaining issues. We appreciate the administration’s proactive approach, and Congress should be ready to act as a last resort. But manufacturers still believe that the parties have it within their power to resolve these talks before they inflict severe economic damage.”

Currently, the American freight rail network accounts for nearly 40% of total freight volume, and a strike or delay in finalizing a long-term contract would have devastating impacts across surface supply chain networks and economic output. The Association of American Railroads recently released a report that found a nationwide freight rail interruption could cost more than $2 billion per day in lost economic activity.

Background: On Monday, Sept. 12, the NAM sent a letter to congressional leaders reiterating support for the work of the Presidential Emergency Board, which has aided in the talks. The NAM also urged Congress to use its statutory authority to institute the PEB’s recommendations should it become necessary to intervene. The NAM supported President Biden’s selection of an independent and objective PEB and believes that the recommendations announced on Aug. 16 have provided an appropriate framework to avoid disruption to freight rail operations.

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.8 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 58% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

View More