Policy and Legal

Press Releases

Manufacturers: Improving Air Quality Is a Top Priority; EPA Announcement Is the Wrong Approach

Washington, D.C. – Following the Environmental Protection Agency’s announcement that it will reconsider National Ambient Air Quality Standards for particulate matter, National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement:

“Improving air quality in the U.S. is a priority for manufacturers, and we’ve worked for years to make progress in delivering some of the cleanest manufacturing processes in the world. Based on the EPA’s own data, air quality has improved by more than 30% over the past 20 years, even as production and energy consumption have increased.

“The EPA’s announcement today to reconsider the PM 2.5 standard will only further weaken an already slowing economy. It will push states and localities into a nonattainment designation, which will halt new investment, stop operations in some circumstances and cost jobs. Manufacturers are already concerned about the threat of a recession—62% believe that the U.S. will officially slip into a recession in 2023, according to the Q4 2022 NAM Manufacturers’ Outlook Survey released yesterday.

“Today’s announcement is the wrong approach. Let manufacturers do what they do best: innovate and deploy modern technologies to protect the environment, while creating jobs and strengthening the economy.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Press Releases

Manufacturers Appreciate President’s Initial Steps on Critical Immigration Issues

Washington, D.C. – National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement on President Biden’s remarks on border security and enforcement.

“The NAM was encouraged when President Biden made immigration a ‘day one’ priority, and now we need members of Congress to do their part—especially with 779,000 open jobs in manufacturing and not enough Americans to fill these vacancies. President Biden’s announcements today, including on border enforcement, are important steps and reflect some of manufacturers’ concerns, but this still highlights the ongoing need for bipartisan congressional action on immigration. Manufacturers have the solution: our ‘A Way Forward’ plan includes post-partisan recommendations for immigration reform that can be acted on this year. I look forward to discussing this plan with world and business leaders next week in Mexico at the North American Leaders’ Summit.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 58% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Press Releases

Manufacturers Need WOTUS Proposal That Provides Permitting Certainty

Manufacturers cannot invest with confidence when the rules keep changing

Washington, D.C. – Following the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed new Waters of the United States rule, National Association of Manufacturers Senior Vice President of Policy and Government Relations Aric Newhouse issued the following statement:

“The EPA is unnecessarily rewriting critical permitting standards and tossing aside Supreme Court precedent in the process. This moving target frustrates efforts to expand domestic manufacturing and create well-paying jobs. Manufacturers cannot invest with confidence when the rules keep changing.

“Manufacturers need a sensible WOTUS proposal that provides permitting certainty and allows the industry to continue leading on environmental stewardship.”

In 2023, the Supreme Court is expected to issue a decision in Sackett v. EPA, a case that will determine the jurisdiction of the Clean Water Act and all regulations within its authority. Previously, the NAM submitted multiple sets of comments regarding the 2015 WOTUS rule to better inform policymakers. In addition, the NAM supported the 2017 executive order instructing the EPA to rescind the rule, and the NAM Legal Center had been in active litigation against the rule starting in 2015. The legal battle included a unanimous victory for the NAM at the U.S. Supreme Court on a key procedural issue, and in 2019, federal judges invalidated the rule.

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Press Releases

Congress Fails to Advance Manufacturing Tax Priorities

Bipartisan Provisions Like R&D Incentives Are Critical to Small Manufacturers’ Ability to Invest

Washington, D.C. – The National Association of Manufacturers is calling on lawmakers to immediately address critical tax provisions that were left out of the 2023 Omnibus spending package, highlighting the negative impact to small manufacturers and their workers.

“Congress’ failure to reverse tax policies that make it more costly to perform research, buy machinery and finance job-creating investments has put hundreds of thousands of American jobs and manufacturing competitiveness at risk. Despite overwhelming support for addressing these issues, Congress’ inaction will now undercut small manufacturers’ ability to invest in their workers, facilities and communities,” said NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons.

Ketchie President and Owner and Incoming Chair of the NAM Small and Medium Manufacturers Group Courtney Silver recently highlighted that congressional action on these tax priorities will help prevent small manufacturers from feeling “stuck between a rock and a hard place. It’s very important that we take action on expanding and locking in that pass-through deduction, increasing those incentives around R&D and protecting those provisions around full expensing and interest deductibility,” said Silver.

“Although the appropriations package included important manufacturing priorities, including the INFORM Consumers Act, with its protections for consumers against counterfeit goods, and the Electoral Count Reform Act, which supports a clear and secure democratic process, pro-competitiveness tax policy changes would have made a big difference for businesses of all sizes across our industry,” continued Timmons. “As the next Congress convenes, we urge lawmakers to prioritize these policies, and we will continue to work with manufacturing champions from both parties to provide tax certainty to the nearly 13 million people who work in manufacturing today.”

Read more about how these critical tax priorities impact small manufacturers across the country here.

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Press Releases

Manufacturers: Protecting American Innovation Critical to Fight Current and Future Health Crises

Washington, D.C. – Following today’s announcement by the World Trade Organization’s General Council that member states have agreed to delay a final decision on an expanded intellectual property waiver for COVID-19 products, National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement:

“The WTO’s decision to delay the expanded intellectual property waiver is a welcome step toward protecting American innovation and technology leadership. This is vital not only for future pandemic responses, but also for the sector’s ability to produce new and advanced treatments or fund critical research and development.

“Manufacturers in the U.S. are leading our post-pandemic recovery and investing heavily in the development of cures and therapeutics. An expanded WTO waiver would force manufacturers in America to give away rights unfairly to international competitors and economic rivals like China, disincentivize companies from continuing the cutting-edge research underway, put jobs at risk and harm the sector’s global competitiveness.

“Manufacturers will continue to work with partners around the world to tackle current and emerging health challenges, while protecting the IP rights of those many companies which have been so essential to an effective pandemic response.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org

Press Releases

New Data: Taxing R&D Will Cost U.S. More Than 260,000 Jobs Next Year If Congress Doesn’t Act

Manufacturers Would Lose 60,000 Jobs and $32 Billion

Washington, D.C. – The National Association of Manufacturers released new analysis revealing that if the tax code’s research and development amortization requirement, which went into effect this year, is not reversed immediately, the U.S. economy would lose 263,382 jobs and experience an $82.39 billion hit to GDP in 2023.

Because the law changes the way businesses have handled investments for decades, companies like NAM member Miltec UV, which develops new UV lamp systems for curing inks and coatings for everything from optical fiber to soup can lids, are having to grapple with a significant new cost that they had not anticipated previously. “Absent congressional action, we’re gonna get hit hard,” said Miltec UV President Bob Blandford. “Our taxes are going to go up dramatically. That’s cash getting sucked out of the business. So that’s going to get pretty ugly.”

The manufacturing industry, which conducts 55% of private-sector R&D, would directly lose 59,392 jobs and face a decline in output of $31.69 billion. Prior to 2022, companies could immediately deduct R&D expenses in the year in which they are incurred, which promotes long-term job-creating investments in the United States. However, requiring companies to spread out these deductions over a period of years penalizes innovation by making R&D more costly.

“A failure to act will burden manufacturers large and small who use this tool to create well-paying jobs and support families and communities,” said NAM Managing Vice President of Tax and Domestic Economic Policy Chris Netram. “We need Congress to act quickly to address this and other critical tax provisions in year-end legislation before we cede our competitive edge to foreign nations like China, which provides a super deduction in the amount of 200% of R&D expenses.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Press Releases

Manufacturers: Permitting Reform Essential to Manufacturing Growth and Competitiveness

Washington, D.C. – Following consideration today of a permitting amendment in the U.S. Senate, National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement:

“Red tape and permitting delays have plagued the manufacturing industry for decades, and the need for reform has only grown more urgent in recent years. Manufacturers have long called for Congress to repair the broken permitting process to minimize delays and reduce needless litigation that stands in the way of energy and resources projects and other investments. That will ensure we can get to work quickly on the investments that the bipartisan infrastructure law and the CHIPS and Science Act make possible. It will also ensure manufacturers have access to reliable and affordable energy while the grid evolves and as we work to improve air quality and reduce greenhouse gases.

“Ultimately, permitting reform effects every part of the American supply chain—from modernizing energy projects to building new manufacturing facilities. Today’s Senate vote, while unsuccessful, should serve as a step toward true bipartisan reform. Manufacturers appreciate the efforts of Sens. Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito to push this priority forward, and we will continue to work with both chambers to achieve this goal.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and accounts for 55% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Policy and Legal

Corning Confronts R&D Hurdles

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This story can also be found within the NAM’s R&D action center.

Corning Incorporated has been turning out innovations for well over a century and a half—since 1851, to be exact. But a recent change in tax policy that makes R&D more expensive could have a significant impact on the company’s ability to build on its impressive history.

  • “We have a wonderful track record for innovation,” said Tymon Daniels, vice president of tax at Corning, a material sciences manufacturing company with a focus on glass.
  • “In 1897, when Thomas Edison was working on electric lights, he came to us to make the glass bulbs. 110 years later, when Steve Jobs was working on the iPhone, he came to us to make the glass used for the screen. More recently, we figured out a way to make special glass vials that sped up production of the COVID vaccine. … We’ve been able to do this because of R&D.”

The issue: Until the beginning of 2022, businesses could deduct 100% of their R&D expenses in the same year they incurred the expenses. Starting this year, however, a tax law change requires businesses to amortize or spread their R&D expenses out over a period of five years, making it more expensive to invest in growth and innovation.

The impact: According to Daniels, the abrupt change in a policy that has existed for decades poses a serious challenge for the company. 

  • “The R&D deduction has been in existence for over 70 years—a very good tax policy. Requiring the amortization of R&D expenses is a dramatic shift to a very bad tax policy,” said Daniels. “It causes a significant spike in cash taxes.”

The trade-offs: At a time when company leaders are trying to make decisions about how to invest finite resources, a significant increase in the tax burden can hinder future growth plans, Daniels emphasized.

  • “Our C-suite is trying to make decisions about big issues like capital expenditures and jobs,” said Daniels. “This makes those decisions harder and comes at a time when the economic outlook is highly uncertain.”

The action: Corning is asking Congress to find a solution, and quickly.

  • “We need lawmakers to extend the full deductibility of R&D expenses,” said Daniels. “If Congress can’t make a permanent fix, then at least making full deductibility retroactive to 2022 and extending it through 2025 would still be good. Otherwise, the impact to Corning may be extra cash taxes of roughly $150 million in 2022 alone.”

The last word: “Requiring the amortization of R&D is all I’m thinking about right now,” said Daniels.

Policy and Legal

“We’re Gonna Get Hit Hard”: How an R&D Tax Policy Change Hurts Manufacturers

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This story can also be found within the NAM’s R&D action center.

Miltec UV operates at the cutting edge of the manufacturing industry, developing new UV lamp systems for curing inks and coatings for everything from optical fiber to soup can lids. But after a tax law change went into effect in 2022, the Maryland-based manufacturer found that R&D became much more expensive—hampering its investments and tamping down its growth.

  • Until the beginning of 2022, businesses could deduct 100% of their R&D expenses in the same year they incurred the expenses. Starting this year, however, a tax law change requires businesses to spread their deductions out over a period of five years, making it more expensive to invest in growth and innovation.

We spoke with Miltec UV President Bob Blandford to understand how the change was impacting his company and consumers in the United States and around the world.

The impact: Because the law changes the way businesses have handled investments for decades, companies like Miltec UV are having to grapple with a significant new cost that they had not anticipated previously.

  • “Absent congressional action, we’re gonna get hit hard,” said Blandford. “Our taxes are going to go up dramatically. That’s cash getting sucked out of the business. So that’s going to get pretty ugly.”

A critical moment: Miltec UV is facing this challenge at a time when its leaders believe an exciting new opportunity is right around the corner. The company has developed a new technology for lithium-ion batteries, which could be used for next-generation electric vehicles.

  • Over the past 11 years, Miltec UV has developed manufacturing electrodes used in these batteries, which will allow manufacturers to reduce costs and eliminate the toxic solvents used in existing battery manufacturing processes.

Yet, the new tax change threatens to place significant burdens on their development of this technology.

  • “The problem is in the auto world; once they say go, it’s about a five-year process,” said Blandford. “They have to prototype, prove it, test it, then make the batteries. And during that time, we need to support R&D and support the business. So amortizing R&D over five years is a showstopper.”
  • “We’re at a critical place now—we’re so close to commercializing it—and now we’re having to pay more taxes out,” said Blandford. “It hurts.”

A burden for employees: If not reversed, the harmful tax change will eat into profits, which Blandford is concerned may impact important benefits for employees. Earlier this year, Miltec UV signed on to the NAM Manufacturers Retirement program—an association-wide 401(k) retirement and savings plan—as a way to improve benefits for employees. The program, which has resulted in cost savings for employees, has proved extremely popular, he added.

  • However, “The tax change will have a tremendous negative impact on cash flow, so everything will be on the table,” including retirement benefits, Blandford said.
  • “Our team is important to us, and the last thing we want to do is have a negative effect on paychecks and benefits,” said Blandford. “This absolutely will have a spillover effect on every part of the business.”

The last word: “Miltec funds 100% of the company’s R&D costs through the profits of its commercial business as opposed to outside investment,” Blandford said.

  • “Spreading the R&D deduction over a five-year period means that each year we will now face a higher tax burden due to the inability to immediately deduct R&D expenses. That is real money that is desperately needed to stay competitive with employee salaries, benefits and even to support new R&D positions that we now are trying to fill.”

Get involved: The NAM has deployed a digital R&D Action Center that manufacturers can visit for critical R&D policy updates, industry stories and an opportunity to engage directly with their members of Congress: https://www.nam.org/protect-innovation/

Press Releases

Manufacturers: An Expanded IP Waiver Would Jeopardize American Innovation and the Ability to Combat Future Pandemics

Washington, D.C. – Following the announcement by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative calling for a delay in a World Trade Organization decision on whether to expand a waiver of intellectual property, National Association of Manufacturers Vice President of International Economic Affairs Ken Monahan released the following statement:

“An expanded intellectual property waiver would jeopardize American innovations that are fundamental to fighting current and future pandemics and undermine U.S. technology leadership over our commercial rivals, such as China. Manufacturers welcome USTR’s announcement supporting a delay in the decision on whether or not to expand the WTO’s waiver on COVID-19 products and domestic supply chains and urge all WTO members to fully consider the consequences of such an expanded waiver.

“Efforts could be better spent focusing on other effective international approaches to deal with ongoing and potential global health crises.”

-NAM-

The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.9 million men and women, contributes $2.77 trillion to the U.S. economy annually and has the largest economic multiplier of any major sector and accounts for 58% of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the NAM or to follow us on Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

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