Workforce

Manufacturers do the jobs of the future. That’s why we train our employees to take on new challenges and why we need motivated, exceptional workers to start careers in modern manufacturing. To advance that goal industry-wide, we support innovative policy and on-the-ground programs to attract, train and retain the next generation workforce.

Press Releases

Manufacturing Institute, NAM and Samsung Seek Creators at MFG Day Event in South Carolina

MFG Day Kicks Off a Month-Long Celebration of Manufacturing—Connecting with the Future Workforce to Fill Manufacturing Skills Gap

Washington, D.C. – National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons traveled to Newberry, South Carolina, today to kick off Manufacturing Day at a flagship event hosted by Samsung. MFG Day, spearheaded by The Manufacturing Institute, the education and workforce partner of the NAM, gives students the opportunity to peak behind the curtain and see what modern manufacturing looks like, aiming to inspire them to pursue careers in the industry.

Timmons joined South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and Samsung Executive Vice President and Head of Corporate Affairs David Steel at the Samsung Electronics Home Appliance facility—the company’s first home appliance manufacturing facility in the United States. The group met with students, business leaders and community influencers to discuss the high-tech, well-paying opportunities in modern manufacturing and the growing number of open jobs at manufacturing facilities across the country.

“Manufacturers across the country are seeking creators—those individuals who want to help solve tomorrow’s challenges today,” said Timmons. “Our industry is growing, and we need passionate, driven individuals to join our ranks. As the skills gap widens, 2.4 million positions across the manufacturing industry could go unfilled by 2028, so we must work to attract and develop new talent. Through MFG Day, we are engaging with the next generation of manufacturers—students—and letting them know our industry’s rallying cry: ‘Creators Wanted.’”

Timmons, Steel and Gov. McMaster were joined by students from Newberry Middle School. The group toured the state-of-the-art factory where Samsung manufacturers many of the home appliances sold in stores across the country. Following the tour, Timmons and Gov. McMaster gave brief remarks to the group, followed by a discussion with the head of human resources, Sherri Satterfield, about ways to inspire more students to pursue careers in modern manufacturing.

“We are proud to work with the National Association of Manufacturers and The Manufacturing Institute to engage students and help demonstrate the opportunities modern manufacturing has to offer,” said Steel. “There are more manufacturing jobs available in South Carolina than there are people to fill them. Opportunities for those seeking a rewarding, high-paying career in manufacturing truly abound.”

According to the latest data from the NAM, South Carolina manufacturers account for 17% of the state’s output, totaling $37.15 billion. In addition, the state has more than 247,000 manufacturing employees across 3,390 companies with an average compensation of more than $72,000.

MFG Day is led by The Manufacturing Institute. First held in 2012 and organized by its founder—the Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International—MFG Day gives manufacturers the opportunity to address the skills gap, connect with future generations, update the public perception of manufacturing and ensure the ongoing prosperity of the industry as a whole. Learn more about MFG Day and the significant impact this event has across the nation here.

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The Manufacturing Institute is the education and workforce partner of the National Association of Manufacturers. It drives programs and research to promote modern manufacturing and jumpstart new approaches to growing manufacturing talent. For more information, please visit www.themanufacturinginstitute.org.

Workforce

Today is #MFGDay19

Manufacturers Open Their Doors on Manufacturing Day

Today thousands of manufacturers and educational institutions across the country are opening their doors to students, parents, teachers and community leaders to celebrate Manufacturing Day. Led by The Manufacturing Institute, the National Association of Manufacturers’ workforce and education partner, Manufacturing Day shows students what a career in modern manufacturing looks like.

The Manufacturing Institute’s Executive Director Carolyn Lee will be in Greensboro, GA, at a Novelis facility.

NAM’s President and CEO Jay Timmons will be joining a Manufacturing Day event at a Samsung facility in Newberry, SC.

To keep up with the latest Manufacturing Day festivities, check out the MI and NAM on Twitter, plus the dedicated Manufacturing Day Twitter. Join the social media conversation by using the hashtag #MFGDay19 in related posts.

Press Releases

Manufacturing Institute, NAM Seek Creators Through Annual Manufacturing Day Celebrations

Washington, D.C. – The Manufacturing Institute, the education and workforce partner of the National Association of Manufacturers, kicked off a month-long celebration of modern manufacturing today on Manufacturing Day. Held annually on the first Friday in October, MFG Day helps show the reality of modern manufacturing careers in an industry that is vital to our economy. Today, thousands of companies and educational institutions around the nation will open their doors to students, parents, teachers and community leaders to showcase all that manufacturing has to offer.

“Our industry is growing and thriving, but we are facing a workforce crisis,” said NAM President and CEO Jay Timmons. “Over the next decade, manufacturers will create 4.6 million jobs—jobs that are high-skill, high-tech and high-paying—but 2.4 million could go unfilled if we don’t close the skills gap. MFG Day shines a spotlight on these opportunities and allows us to connect with the next generation of creators who will lead this industry into the future.”

Timmons will join South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster and Samsung Executive Vice President and Head of Corporate Affairs David Steel, along with local students, business leaders and community influencers at Samsung Electronics Home Appliance facility in Newberry, South Carolina. Manufacturing Institute Executive Director Carolyn Lee will travel to Greensboro, Georgia, to visit Novelis and tour its state-of-the-art aluminum recycling center. Novelis Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and NAM board member Dev Ahuja will join Lee.

“MFG Day aims to change the narrative around manufacturing. Many people have no sense of what modern manufacturing looks like in today’s economy. We want to connect with the future workforce—America’s students—and showcase the innovation and collaboration that drives manufacturing today,” said Lee. “MFG Day is an opportunity for anyone looking to join us on this exciting journey to get a firsthand look inside some of the country’s great manufacturing companies.”

First held in 2012 and organized by its founder—the Fabricators & Manufacturers Association, International—MFG Day gives manufacturers the opportunity to address the skills gap, connect with future generations, update the public perception of manufacturing and ensure the ongoing prosperity of the industry as a whole.

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The Manufacturing Institute is the education and workforce partner of the National Association of Manufacturers. It drives programs and research to promote modern manufacturing and jumpstart new approaches to growing manufacturing talent. For more information, please visit www.themanufacturinginstitute.org.

Press Releases

NAM Statement on Third Meeting of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board

Washington, D.C. – National Association of Manufacturers President and CEO Jay Timmons released the following statement on the third meeting of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board:

Today the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board released our initial recommendations, demonstrating that the board has already made significant progress. Manufacturers are proud to be a part of this effort as we build the workforce of tomorrow for our industry and across the American economy. With 4.6 million jobs to fill over the next decade, manufacturers in America are facing a workforce crisis—but it also presents us an opportunity to bring more people into high-paying careers if we connect them with the right training. Government, educators, community leaders and businesses all have a role to play and an obligation to help lead. That is why the NAM and The Manufacturing Institute this year launched Creators Wanted, an unprecedented campaign to inspire the next generation of manufacturing workers.

Background

The American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, chaired by Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, was established by the Department of Commerce pursuant to Executive Order 13845, Establishing the President’s National Council for the American Worker. The Board provides advice and recommendations on ways to encourage the private sector and educational institutions to combat the skills crisis by investing in and increasing demand-driven education, training and re-training, including training through apprenticeships and work-based learning opportunities.

Timmons was nominated to serve on the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board in September 2018 by Carolyn Lee, executive director of The Manufacturing Institute, the workforce and education partner of the NAM. Timmons also serves as chairman of the board of the Institute. According to a landmark 2018 study conducted by the Institute and Deloitte, the manufacturing industry will need to fill 4.6 million jobs over the next decade, 2.4 million of which are expected to go unfilled. In July, on behalf of manufacturers at the one-year anniversary of the Pledge to America’s Workers, Timmons pledged 1.186 million new training and upskilling opportunities for manufacturing workers.

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The National Association of Manufacturers is the largest manufacturing association in the United States, representing small and large manufacturers in every industrial sector and in all 50 states. Manufacturing employs more than 12.8 million men and women, contributes $2.38 trillion to the U.S. economy annually, has the largest economic multiplier of any major sector and accounts for more than three-quarters of private-sector research and development. The NAM is the powerful voice of the manufacturing community and the leading advocate for a policy agenda that helps manufacturers compete in the global economy and create jobs across the United States. For more information about the Manufacturers or to follow us on Shopfloor, Twitter and Facebook, please visit www.nam.org.

Workforce

NAM in 5 Photos: Week of Sept. 9

This week, the National Association of Manufacturers helped move the manufacturing industry forward on three major fronts.

VIEW THE PHOTO GALLERY

 

Workforce

Manufacturing Institute to Expand FAME Apprenticeship Program

The National Association of Manufacturers, the Manufacturing Institute and Toyota Motor North America on Tuesday announced the operational and stewardship transition of Toyota’s Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education (FAME) program to the MI.

NAM CEO Jay Timmons and MI Executive Director Carolyn Lee were joined by Advisor to the President Ivanka Trump at Alabama Robotics Technology Park in Huntsville, AL, for the announcement.

FAME apprentices receive a two-year industrial degree, Advanced Manufacturing Technician, while working in their sponsor’s manufacturing facility. FAME trains students of all ages and backgrounds, from recent high school graduates to experienced manufacturing employees looking to advance their careers.

FAME chapters are currently operating in 13 states, and the MI will expand the program nationwide.

Education pathways to skilled careers and an expansion of apprenticeship programs are key goals of the NAM and MI’s Creators Wanted Fund, a campaign to inspire more Americans to pursue careers in modern manufacturing.

For more information, read the MI’s press release.

Click here to see photos from the event

Workforce

Attract the Next Generation by Getting Involved in Manufacturing Day

Manufacturing Day, led by the Manufacturing Institute and the National Association of Manufacturers, is kicking off on Oct. 4.

Carolyn Lee, the Manufacturing Institute’s executive director, explains what makes this event unique, why it’s personally important to her and how you can get involved.

What is Manufacturing Day?

Manufacturing Day shows off what modern manufacturing looks like. Kicking off on the first Friday in October—and continuing throughout the month—this annual event helps manufacturing companies and educational institutions open their doors to students, parents, teachers, community leaders and more. Manufacturing Day shows students why they should consider a career in manufacturing and what skills manufacturing companies are looking for in job candidates.

How does Manufacturing Day make a difference for students?

On Manufacturing Day last year, hard material manufacturer CERATIZIT hosted an event in Michigan. At the beginning of the day, they asked the group who was interested in a career in manufacturing. Only three or four students raised their hands. The students then spent the day taking the tour of the facility, trying out CERATIZIT’s products and using CAD software to make their own keychains. At the end of the day, they were asked the same question about who would be interested in a career in manufacturing. This time, there were only three or four students who didn’t raise their hands!

You might think you know what manufacturing looks like today, but seeing is believing — and seeing modern manufacturing firsthand can be life-changing for students. I hope that Manufacturing Day makes a difference in the lives of the students who attend, getting them to seriously consider a career in manufacturing.

Why is Manufacturing Day important to you?

I grew up in a manufacturing family. My dad, grandfather and even my grandmother for a short time worked in manufacturing. When I was a kid, manufacturing was a lot different than it is today — and I still thought it was cool! Now, it’s even more amazing. Manufacturing careers are increasingly high-tech, and technology is increasingly an integral part of the industry. Manufacturing employees are excited about technology, and they’re excited to learn and grow in their careers.

It’s always amazing to see what the manufacturing workforce makes and what goes into making the things that improve our lives every day and how they do it. Manufacturing Day is the way for everyone to see it for themselves.

How can I get involved in Manufacturing Day?

If you’re a manufacturer, plan an event for your community on Oct. 4 (or another day in October), and make sure to register it on Manufacturing Day’s website. If you’re a student, parent or teacher, find events being held in your area using the map on our website.

Workforce

Heroes MAKE America Fuels Veteran’s Oil and Gas Career

As a child, Josh Matherne dreamed of joining the military. He realized that dream as a team supervisor in the U.S. Army infantry at Fort Hood, where he mentored younger soldiers and helped ensure that they were doing their jobs safely and successfully.

“My grandfather was in the Marines, and he really pointed me in the right direction,” said Matherne. “I always thought it was the right thing to do. As soon as I could serve, I wanted to serve.”

All the while, Matherne was interested in the oil and gas manufacturing industry. When he began to think about a civilian career, the Heroes MAKE America program was a natural fit. The program aims to build a mutually beneficial pipeline between the military and manufacturing, offering transitioning service members in-demand manufacturing skills and training, and educating manufacturers on how to recruit and retain members of the military and their families. As a student in the Heroes program, Matherne expanded his knowledge in manufacturing and tailored his resume to reflect his work ethic, determination and passion for the industry. Through the program’s regular networking opportunities, company tours and training support, the initiative helped him launch his new career.

“The Heroes program gave me an idea of what I was getting myself into,” said Matherne. “It eased my transition by getting me into the civilian mindset and taught me how to interact with civilian workers.”

Like many Heroes MAKE America participants, Matherne initially wondered if his skills would transfer into his field of interest. But shortly after he began his current role as a chemical operator at Occidental Chemical in La Porte, Texas, he found that his military training made him ideal for a position that required discipline and attention to detail. He has already been fast-tracked toward a promotion, and he has found a familiar rhythm that reminds him of his experience as an infantry team leader.

“It’s kind of like the military,” said Matherne. “The family-style team; being a part of something worth being a part of.”

Matherne continues to share open job opportunities within his company and other oil and gas companies in order to help other veterans like him find their next career in a well-paying, growing sector. He’s also mentoring new veteran hires, giving them a sense of what to expect during their transition and teaching them how they can use their past training to succeed in manufacturing.

“It’s a great atmosphere, has great people, and has a similar structure to the military,” said Matherne. “The manufacturing industry loves the drive we have and the discipline we have. They love seeing it, and they love hiring it.”

Learn more about the Manufacturing Institute’s Heroes MAKE America program.

Workforce

New Report Dives Into Retaining The Aging Manufacturing Workforce

Right now, one-quarter of the manufacturing workforce is over 55 years old. Meanwhile, the manufacturing industry is struggling to attract enough younger workers with the right skills and qualifications. Facing a workforce crisis—with open jobs in manufacturing recently reaching an all-time high—manufacturers are finding that retaining older workers is not only a necessity but an asset.

The Manufacturing Institute’s Center for Manufacturing Research, in partnership with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, recently conducted a survey to discover how companies are addressing this shifting demographic challenges.

This workforce issue affects nearly all manufacturers, the study found. Ninety-seven percent of respondents reported that they fear losing institutional knowledge when these workers depart.

“Manufacturing is facing a demographic sea change—leaders in the industry know it, and many are proactively adapting to it,” said Chad Moutray, the Manufacturing Institute’s Center for Manufacturing Research director and the National Association of Manufacturers’ chief economist. “Given the current workforce crisis, other manufacturers should look to the successful initiatives being implemented in the industry and collectively expand on them to develop the workforce of tomorrow. The simple fact is that companies are very concerned about losing their top talent to retirement and are finding creative ways to keep them longer and to train younger workers.”

The study also examined the innovative approaches manufacturers can use to extend older workers’ productivity and help transfer institutional knowledge to the next generation. For example, manufacturers are implementing upskilling and training programs to address the challenges this demographic may experience. Sixty-nine percent of companies said they had on-the-job training programs, and 54 percent said they have internal technical training programs.

“Manufacturers are utilizing the expertise of their older workers, implementing policies and procedures to keep them longer and creating opportunities to pass on their knowledge and talents to the next generation,” said Carolyn Lee, the Manufacturing Institute’s executive director. “The reason for this is clear: unlocking the knowledge of today’s older manufacturing workers is critical to shaping tomorrow’s industry leaders.”

Read the full report.

Workforce

Manufacturing Output Hits All-Time High, Signaling Industry’s Strength

For the past two years, manufacturers have been setting new records when it comes to manufacturing output, and through the first quarter of 2019, the industry has continued to reach new heights.

Four out of five manufacturers remain positive about their company’s outlook, according the National Association of Manufacturers’ latest Outlook Survey, and new Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) data find that manufacturers’ level of output hit an all-time high once again. As noted in the recent BEA report, manufacturers produced a total of $2.3852 trillion worth of goods for the economy in the first quarter of 2019, up from $2.3845 trillion in the fourth quarter of 2018.

“Manufacturing output has consistently set new records since the beginning of 2017, and while we have seen softer data so far in 2019 than we might prefer, I would continue to expect the sector to hit new all-time highs throughout the rest of this year,” the NAM’s Chief Economist Chad Moutray said.

In fact, manufacturing accounted for 11.3 percent of real GDP in the first quarter of 2019—and the industry continues to have the largest economic multiplier of any major sector.

“At a time when conventional wisdom holds that the sector is less important than it once was, all of these data show manufacturing in the United States is alive and kicking, producing more goods than ever and continuing to be a bright spot in the economy,” Moutray said.

The industry’s continued success has created many new jobs as well. Manufacturing job openings were also at an all-time high in May with 509,000 open jobs, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. This solid job creation is actually exacerbating an existing challenge in the industry: a lack of enough skilled workers.

Manufacturers could have 2.4 million unfilled jobs by 2028 unless the right steps are taken today to build the workforce of tomorrow. The NAM and The Manufacturing Institute are leading the way toward solving this workforce crisis, and they have launched a $10 million Creators Wanted campaign, which plans to fill 600,000 manufacturing jobs by 2025.

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